International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 223--227

A qualitative and quantitative comparison of adverse drug reaction data in different drug information sources


Gurpreet Kaur Randhawa1, Rajeev Sharma2, Navyug Raj Singh1, Nidhi Sharma1 
1 Department of Pharmacology, Government Medical College, Amritsar, Punjab, India
2 Department of Medicine, Guru Nanak Dev Hospital, Government Medical College, Amritsar, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Navyug Raj Singh
Department of Pharmacology, Government Medical College, Amritsar - 143 001, Punjab
India

Background: For safe use of medicines, awareness regarding the existing knowledge of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is essential to prevent, identify, and manage them. Aim: The present study is planned to assess variation in documented ADRs of antihypertensive drugs in various sources of drug information. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken to analyze the different sources of ADRs-related information. Textbooks, National Formulary India (NFI), Drug Today (DT), and Current Index of Medical Specialties (CIMS) were analyzed for ADRs pertaining to nine antihypertensive groups comprising a total of 44 drugs. ADRs were categorized according to body systems, tabulated, and compared. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of ADRs and serious ADRs were done. Results and Discussion: Textbooks mostly provided ADRs of drug groups as a whole and not of individual drugs. None of the analyzed sources mentioned all antihypertensive drugs. DT contained information for the maximum number of drugs studied (81.8%) and NFI gave information for 29.7% drugs only. There was a wide variability among various resources while listing ADRs. NFI listed the maximum number of total ADRs, and least ADR information was provided by DT. NFI mentioned the maximum number of serious ADRs (47) for prototype drugs followed by CIMS (36) and DT (8). The quality of data was better in NFI, but none of the resources studied were found to be complete. Conclusion: No source of information was complete in providing wholesome information of ADRs studied, and there was a wide variability in describing them.


How to cite this article:
Randhawa GK, Sharma R, Singh NR, Sharma N. A qualitative and quantitative comparison of adverse drug reaction data in different drug information sources.Int J App Basic Med Res 2017;7:223-227


How to cite this URL:
Randhawa GK, Sharma R, Singh NR, Sharma N. A qualitative and quantitative comparison of adverse drug reaction data in different drug information sources. Int J App Basic Med Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2021 Sep 28 ];7:223-227
Available from: https://www.ijabmr.org/article.asp?issn=2229-516X;year=2017;volume=7;issue=4;spage=223;epage=227;aulast=Randhawa;type=0