International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 76--80

Scanning electron microscope corroboration of ameloglyphics – A new tool in forensic odontology


Kanika Singroha1, Abhishek Banerjee2, VV Kamath3, J Pramod4, Saha Alangkar5, E Elampovai6 
1 Private Practioner, JDC, Jodhpur, Awadh Dental College and Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India
2 Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Awadh Dental College and Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India
3 Department of Oral Pathology, Dr. Syamala Reddy Dental College and Research Centre, Bengaluru, India
4 Department of Oral Pathology, Awadh Dental College, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India
5 Department of Oral Surgery, Bardhaman Dental College and Hospital, Bardhaman, West Bengal, India
6 Department of Oral Pathology, NSVK Dental College Hospital, Bengaluru, India

Correspondence Address:
Abhishek Banerjee
5/17 Ambagan, Benachity, Durgapur - 713 213, West Bengal
India

Background: Human teeth resist decomposition to the maximum and has immense potential to serve as hard-tissue counterpart to dermatoglyphics in forensic odontology. Ameloglyphics is the science of recording and analyzing the tooth print. Aims and Objectives: To assess the scope of viability, reproducibility, and identification of enamel prints (akin to fingerprints) and their patterns as a tool for identification. To establish that expression of enamel prints is a direct result of the enamel rod configuration on the surface of the crown as detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: The teeth samples (n = 10) were first analyzed through (SEM) and the image of the arrangement of rods on the surface was captured. Enamel prints were registered in a standard procedure by virtue of ink transfer on a cellophane tape from etched tooth enamel surface of the same samples. These prints and SEM images were subjected to Rapid Sizer® image editing software to obtain a pattern (sketched outline image software). Patterns were identified manually. Results: Reproducibility, specificity, and feasibility of the above procedure were determined. There appeared to be a high rate of reproducibility (98%–100%) and specificity (100%). The paraphernalia required as well as the technique entrenched were feasible. Furthermore, the SEM analysis established the viability and reliability. Conclusion: Ameloglyphics is a sensitive and reproducible scientific tool that can be utilized for the management, examination, and evaluation of dental evidence for identification at crime scene and disaster sites. Its importance vis-a-vis fingerprints cannot be understated, especially in view of the seeming indestructibility of the enamel.


How to cite this article:
Singroha K, Banerjee A, Kamath V V, Pramod J, Alangkar S, Elampovai E. Scanning electron microscope corroboration of ameloglyphics – A new tool in forensic odontology.Int J App Basic Med Res 2020;10:76-80


How to cite this URL:
Singroha K, Banerjee A, Kamath V V, Pramod J, Alangkar S, Elampovai E. Scanning electron microscope corroboration of ameloglyphics – A new tool in forensic odontology. Int J App Basic Med Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 26 ];10:76-80
Available from: http://www.ijabmr.org/article.asp?issn=2229-516X;year=2020;volume=10;issue=2;spage=76;epage=80;aulast=Singroha;type=0