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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 38-40

To design and implement a prescription writing teaching module for second professional medical students


1 Department of Pharmacology, Dr. RP Government Medical College, Kangra at Tanda, Himachal Pradesh, India
2 Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. RP Government Medical College, Kangra at Tanda, Himachal Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Parveen Kumar Sharma
Department of Pharmacology, Dr. RP Government Medical College, Kangra at Tanda - 176 001, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-516X.162270

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Context: There is ample evidence to prove that medical graduates are not prescribing rationally and this can be improved by proper training. Aims: To design and implement a prescription writing teaching module for second professional medical students. Subjects and Methods: A module of 3 h duration consisting of didactic lecture, interactive audiovisual small group session, and evaluation method was framed for every disease and implemented. Completeness of the prescriptions was evaluated on a scale of 1-4. Appropriateness of the prescription, knowledge about the rationale behind the drugs used and adverse events related to the drugs used was judged in three categories, that is, appropriate and complete; appropriate but insufficient; and inappropriate. Results: One thousand six hundred and seven response sheets to 24 health problems were collected. Completeness score of 18% was 2, 59% was 3% and 24% was 4.41% prescriptions were appropriate and complete, 58% appropriate but insufficient and 1% inappropriate. The rationale behind the drugs used was appropriate and complete 24%, appropriate but insufficient 68%, inappropriate 8%. Documentation of adverse events was appropriate and complete 23%, appropriate but insufficient 49%, inappropriate 28%. All facilitators were satisfied with the duration, contents and conduct of the sessions. Conclusions: A module is an effective tool for teaching prescription writing to undergraduate students; modifications required in contents and strategy to emphasize the need of complete documentation.


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