Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  Users Online: 933 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 72-76

Does short-term exposure to elevated levels of natural gamma radiation in Ramsar cause oxidative stress?


1 Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering; Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Emeritus Professor, Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA
3 Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Department of Physiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5 Department of Nuclear Physics, Guilan University of Science, Rasht, Gilan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Prof. SMJ Mortazavi
Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering, School of Medicine, Zand, Shiraz
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Ionizing and Non.ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-516X.136778

Rights and Permissions

Background: Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has areas with some of the highest recorded levels of natural radiation among inhabited areas measured on the earth. Aims: To determine whether short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation induce oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: In this study, 53 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 10-12 animals. Animals in the 1 st group were kept for 7 days in an outdoor area with normal background radiation while the 2 nd , 3 rd , 4 th and 5 th groups were kept in four different outdoor areas with naturally elevated levels of gamma radiation in Ramsar. A calibrated RDS-110 survey meter, mounted on a tripod approximately 1 m above the ground, was used to measure exposure rate at each location. On days 7 and 9 blood sampling was performed to assess the serum levels of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). On day 8, all animals were exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy gamma radiations emitted by a Theratron Phoenix (Theratronics, Canada) Cobalt-60 (55 cGy/min) at Radiotherapy Department of Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran. Results: Findings obtained in this study indicate that high levels of natural radiation cannot induce oxidative stress. CAT and MDA levels in almost all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.69 and P = 0.05, respectively). After exposure to the lethal dose, CAT and MDA levels in all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.054 and P = 0.163, respectively). Conclusions: These findings indicate that short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation (up to 196 times higher than the normal background) does not induce oxidative stress.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1922    
    Printed43    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded234    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 5    

Recommend this journal