Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  Users Online: 303 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  

 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133  

Rhamnolipid production among clinical and skin isolates of healthy individuals of Acinetobacter species: The first report


1 Department of Microbiology, Dr. ALM Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai, India
2 Department of Clinical Microbiology, Madras Medical Mission, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication27-Aug-2013

Correspondence Address:
Srivani S Ramesh
Department of Microbiology, Dr. ALM Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-516X.117103

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Prakasam G, Anusha R, Ramesh SS. Rhamnolipid production among clinical and skin isolates of healthy individuals of Acinetobacter species: The first report. Int J App Basic Med Res 2013;3:133

How to cite this URL:
Prakasam G, Anusha R, Ramesh SS. Rhamnolipid production among clinical and skin isolates of healthy individuals of Acinetobacter species: The first report. Int J App Basic Med Res [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Jan 20];3:133. Available from: http://www.ijabmr.org/text.asp?2013/3/2/133/117103

Sir,

Acinetobacter species
are gram-negative, non-fermentative coccobacilli that has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen incriminated in outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. [1] Increasing reports of non-baumannii Acinetobacter spp.-associated infections are emerging nowadays. However, these bacteria are frequently refused as contaminants from environment, thus they are of little clinical importance. [2] Choi et al., (2006) stated that the mortality rate of other Acinetobacter spp. is not less than that of A. baumannii.[3] Rhamnolipids (RLs) are glycolipids comprising of L-rhamnose and 3-hydroxylalkanoic acid and is produced by several bacteria, most importantly Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is an important virulent factor as it can inactivate tracheal cilia of mammalian cells and reduce the phagocytic activity of macrophages by altering the F actin network. [4] Virulence determinants of Acinetobacter spp. are ill-defined and, so far, previous literatures have not yielded any information regarding RLs-producing Acinetobacter spp. Hence, we planned to investigate the RL production in Acinetobacter spp. from clinical sources and from the skin of healthy individuals. We adopted Siegmund and Wagner plate method for the detection of RL of Acinetobacter spp. [5] A total of 108 clinical isolates of A. baumannii and 28 commensal isolates of Acinetobacter spp. (24 A. lwoffii and 4 A. junii) from the skin of healthy individuals were assessed in this study. Out of 108 A. baumannii isolates, 38 were from endotracheal aspirates, 20 from blood, 15 from pus, 10 from urine, 8 from sputum, 5 from bronchoalveolar lavage, 5 from wound swabs, 3 from oropharyngeal aspirates, 2 from nasopharyngeal aspirates, and one each from diabetic foot ulcer and central vein tip. The results showed that 12/108 (11.1%) clinical isolates of A. baumannii and 2/28 (7.1%) A. lwoffii from the skin of healthy individuals were positive for RL production. This is the first report of Acinetobacter spp. from clinical source and from the skin of healthy individuals producing RL. Although Acinetobacter spp. have become well-established nosocomial pathogens, not much is known about their virulence factor. This is the preliminary study conducted on Acinetobacter spp. It may be hypothesized that this RL production can also be one of the virulent factors of Acinetobacter spp. However, further studies need to be conducted on this virulent trait to elucidate the actual mechanism of Acinetobacter in relation with pathogenicity.

 
   References Top

1.Gordon NC, Wareham DW. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacterbaumannii: Mechanisms of virulence and resistance. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2010;35:219-26.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.Patil JR, Chopade BA. Distribution and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species on the skin of healthy humans. Natl Med J India 2001;14:204-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.Choi SH, Choo EJ, Kwak YG, Kim MI, Jun JB, Kim MN, et al. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter species other than Acinetobacterbaumannii: Comparsion with A. baumannii bacteremia. J Infect Chemother 2006;12:380-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Kownatzki R, Tummler B, Doring G. Rhamnolipid of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum of cystic fibrosis patients. Lancet 1987;1:1026-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Pinzon NM, Ju LK. Improved detection of rhamnolipid production using agar plates containing methylene blue and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Biotechnol Lett 2009;31:1583-8.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    



This article has been cited by
1 Diagnostic value of anti-microbial peptide, cathelicidin in congenital pneumonia
Ghada I. Gad,Nancy M. Abushady,Marwa S. Fathi,Wafaa Elsaadany
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2014; : 1
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1786    
    Printed27    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded228    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal